Falcon 9 rocket launch with CRS-23 mission – August 29, 2021

Falcon 9 rocket launch with CRS-23 mission – August 29, 2021

Friday, August 27, 2021 3:28 PM

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The Falcon 9 rocket, bearing the traces of the three previous missions, and the Dragon 2 cargo capsule at the LC-39A launch site at the Space Center. Kennedy in Florida (Source: NASA Kennedy / SpaceX)

The Falcon 9 rocket, bearing the traces of the three previous missions, and the Dragon 2 cargo capsule at the LC-39A launch site at the Space Center.  Kennedy in Florida (Source: NASA Kennedy / SpaceX)

The Falcon 9 rocket, bearing the traces of the three previous missions, and the Dragon 2 cargo capsule at the LC-39A launch site at the Space Center. Kennedy in Florida (Source: NASA Kennedy / SpaceX)


Update 2021-08-28 09:36

The start on August 28 was canceled due to the weather. It is currently scheduled for August 29 at 09:14 CEST.

The Falcon 9 rocket with the twenty-third supply mission to the International Space Station (ISS) is scheduled to launch on August 29, 2021 at 09:14 Polish time (07:14 UTC). The rocket will set off from the LC-39A launch pad at the Kennedy in Florida and will be carrying the Dragon 2 cargo capsule loaded with supplies, spare parts and science experiments. It will be the third mission in the second phase of the NASA CRS program ( Commercial Resupply Services), which assumes delivery of goods to the ISS by private companies.

The broadcast from the start will be available live on our website.

Dragon 2 cargo capsule on top of the Falcon 9 rocket ahead of the CRS-23 mission (Source: SpaceX)The first stage of the Falcon 9 rocket, which will take part in this mission, was previously used in three missions: Crew-1 in November 2020, Crew-2 in April 2021 and SXM-8 in June 2021. After the separation of the second stage, the landing of the booster in the Atlantic Ocean on the platform is planned A Shortfall of Gravitas (ASOG) who has not participated in any mission so far. The Dragon 2 cargo ship will be reused for the first time during its upcoming launch. Previously, it took part in a supply flight to the ISS as part of the CRS-21 mission.

This particular copy of the cargo Dragon 2, designated C208, by taking part in the CRS-23 mission will set a new record for SpaceX ships. It will fly in the shortest time interval ever, which is exactly 8 months, 22 days, 14 hours and 57 minutes. The previous record belonged to the ship C206, participating in the Crew Demo-2 and Crew-2 missions, between which the intervals were 10 months, 23 days, 17 hours and 27 minutes.

As with any supply mission, some interesting scientific experiments were found on board the cargo ship Dragon 2 among the supplies and spare parts.

  • READI FP
    Creators and READI FP experiment prepared to be placed in a spaceship and take off (Source: ALI scarl / Marcenter)One of them is READI FP (ang. REducing Arthritis Dependent Inflammation First Phase). The experiment investigates the effect of bioactive metabolic products, such as antioxidants, on the structure of bones subjected to microgravity. The metabolites used in the experiment are plant extracts obtained as a by-product in the wine production process. Space flights weaken astronauts’ skeletal system, and READI FP aims to better understand the processes taking place at that time and reduce their negative impact.
  • DLR-EAC Retinal Diagnostics Study
    Two-thirds of astronauts who stay in microgravity for at least 30 days begin to suffer from SANS (ang. Space-Associated Neuro-Ocular Syndrome) – a wide range of symptoms related to eye dysfunction, such as choroidal folds or flattening of the eyeball. The DLR-EAC Retinal Diagnostics experiment aims to advance the diagnosis of the retina of the eye. The researchers want to check whether a small and non-invasive device based on the use of light will be able to properly register and detect changes in the retinas of astronauts’ eyes. The experiment is sponsored by the European Space Agency (ESA), the German Space Agency (DLR) and the European Astronaut Center (EAC) Institute of Space Medicine.
  • GITAI S1 Robotic Arm Tech Demo (Nanoracks-GITAI Robotic Arm)
    Complete configuration of the GITAI S1 robotic arm inside the Bishop module dummy (Source: GITAI, NRAL)The experiment using the GITAI S1 robotic arm aims to demonstrate its agility in microgravity. The results of the study will contribute to the improvement of the robotic workforce dedicated to astronaut assistance, which may include servicing, assembly and production tasks in orbit. The use of robotic arms would reduce the cost of individual tasks and would increase the safety of astronauts who would not have to carry out dangerous activities personally. The technology tested in the Nanoracks-GITAI experiment could also be used on Earth in places that are dangerous to people or in areas with difficult access. All activities carried out as part of GITAI S1 Robotic Arm Tech Demo will take place inside the Nanoracks Bishop Airlock module, which was carried to the ISS by SpaceX during the CRS-21 mission in December 2020.
  • MISSE-15 NASA (the. Materials International Space Station Experiment-15-NASA)
    MISSE-15 is another NASA experiment in the MISSE series to test the strength and performance of individual materials and components exposed to space. The conclusions from this type of observation drive the development of better materials used in the production of spacecraft, space suits, or for the development of all components necessary in space exploration. Space-resistant materials can also be used in harsh and extreme conditions on Earth.
  • APEX-08
    Seedlings of different genotypes on day 9 of growth under the same conditions as the ISS;  image made as part of the verification tests of the APEX-08 experiment at the Space Center.  Kennedy (Source: Dr. Shih-Heng Su)Plants grown under microgravity conditions usually show signs of stress which adversely affects their development. The APEX-08 experiment will investigate the role of polyamines in the Arabidopsia’s response to microgravity stress by initiating the use of these chemicals by plants. APEX-08 research combined with genetic engineering could contribute to the creation of microgravity-resistant plants for use in future space missions.

A successful static test prior to the CRS-23 mission took place on August 26, 2021. The weather forecasts now give a 60% chance of starting on the scheduled date. Cumulus clouds as well as precipitation can be the main obstacles. If the mission is postponed by two days, the chances of starting increase to 80%.

The autonomous docking of the Dragon 2 cargo capsule to the International Space Station is planned less than 31 hours after take-off.

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Falcon 9 rocket launch with CRS-23 mission – August 29, 2021