European parliament votes for repair right

The European Parliament will vote on a resolution that should give consumers more options for repairing electronics or having them repaired. Although it is up to the Commission to elaborate the policy.

The ‘right to repair’ or ‘right to repair’ means that electrical appliances may and can be repaired. This is a problem with certain smartphones, among other things, replacing the screen or battery is possible, but usually at your own risk and manufacturers often do not make it easy to open their device just like that.

In that context, the European Parliament votes a resolution on a more sustainable internal market. This includes making repairs more attractive and affordable, with longer warranty periods, warranties on replaced parts and easier access to information about repair options.

In the margin of the resolution, there is also a call to work on a universal charger (especially for smartphones). A point that Europe has been working on for more than ten years. On a voluntary basis, almost all smartphone makers have switched to USB-C for years. Only Apple has its own adapter that it refuses to adapt.

What is changing?

The resolution is currently primarily a signal from the European Parliament to the European Commission to draw up further rules on this. So nothing will change at the moment, but it will pave the way for rules to make electronic devices easier to repair.

12 million tons of electronic waste

The intention of more recoverability is not only to make the repair itself cheaper or easier. In the long term, this should also ensure that appliances last longer and are therefore replaced less quickly. That should reduce the electronic waste mountain.

And that is necessary. The Global E-waste Monitor shows that Europe generated 12 million tons of electronic waste last year, or 16.2 kilograms per inhabitant. Less than half, 42.5 percent, is effectively collected and recycled.

If we zoom in on Western Europe, the recycling figure is slightly higher at 54 percent, but our region also generates a lot more electronic waste, about 20.3 kilograms per inhabitant.

The ‘right to repair’ or ‘right to repair’ means that electrical appliances may and can be repaired. This is a problem with certain smartphones, among other things, replacing the screen or battery is possible, but usually at your own risk and manufacturers often do not make it easy to open their device. In that context, the European Parliament votes a resolution on a more sustainable internal market. Among other things, this is about making repairs more attractive and also more affordable, with longer warranty periods, guarantees on replaced parts and easier access to information about repair options. charger (especially for smartphones). A point that Europe has been working on for more than ten years. On a voluntary basis, almost all smartphone makers have switched to USB-C for years. Only Apple still has its own adapter that it refuses to adjust. The resolution is currently mainly a signal from the European Parliament to the European Commission to draw up further rules about this. So nothing will change at the moment, but it will pave the way for rules to make repairable electronic devices easier. The intention of more repairability is not just to make repairing itself cheaper or easier. In the long term, this should also ensure that appliances last longer and are therefore replaced less quickly. That should reduce the electronic waste mountain. And that is necessary. The Global E-waste Monitor shows that Europe generated 12 million tons of electronic waste last year, or 16.2 kilograms per inhabitant. Less than half, 42.5 percent, is effectively collected and recycled. If we zoom in on Western Europe, the recycling figure is slightly higher at 54 percent, but our region also generates a lot more electronic waste, about 20, 3 kilograms per inhabitant.

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European parliament votes for repair right