Apple introduces notebooks and Mac mini based on its own M1 power source

As expected, tech giant Apple has presented its first computers powered by the Silicon M1, the proprietary processor the company has developed. It concerns a new MacBook Air and MacBook Pro, and an upgrade of the Mac mini desktop.

With the ARM technology-based Silicon M1, Apple is saying goodbye to the Intel processors that have been the beating heart of every Mac computer that has rolled off the production line since 2006. It is at least as important a transition as the transition from the PowerPC power source (the main Mac processor since 1994) to the Intel platform.

The difference with the PowerPC and Intel era is that Apple developed the new Silicon chip in-house. The tech giant is not ready for his test piece in that regard. The so-called socs (system-on-a-chip) that power the iPhone, iPad, Apple Watch and Apple TV also come from Apple itself.

It’s inside

CEO Tim Cook promised this summer that the first Macs based on Silicon technology would hit the market this year, and the CEO kept his word. The new MacBook Air, MacBook Pro and Mac mini unveiled this week are available immediately.

On the outside, the three computers have hardly changed. The laptops got a keyboard with a few other keys (such as Do Not Disturb and Dictaphone), the screens now support P3 wide color (a wider color range) and the ports of the Mac mini are now also suitable for Thunderbolt and USB 4.

Under the hood it’s a different story. With its 16 billion transistors, the Silicom M1 not only contains the equivalent of the Intel processor (CPU), but also houses the GPU, Neural Engine and I/O control (input/output). This results in fewer components, but according to Apple also better performance and less energy consumption. For example, the CPU of the three new computers would perform 2.8x to 3.5x better, the GPU 5x to 6x and the Neural Engine even between 9x and 15x. The battery life of the MacBooks also improves considerably: up to 18 hours for the Air, up to 20 hours for the Pro. The latter is the highest autonomy to date for a MacBook.

One ecosystem

An additional advantage of the switch to its own Silicon processor is that Apple will soon have one universal development platform. Applications that will soon be developed for macOS 11, alias Big Sur, can be made suitable for iOS 14 or iPadOS 14 in no time at all, and vice versa. That may make the Apple ecosystem even more attractive for programmers, because that way they can kill several birds with one stone.

According to Apple, the Intel platform will be supported “for several more years”, and the company has a number of new computers with Intel chips in the pipeline anyway. For the time being, they will also remain available: certain MacBook Pros and Mac minis with Intel on board.

Target prices: The MacBook Air M1 (13-inch) is available from 1,129 euros, the MacBook Pro M1 (13-inch) from 1,449 euros and the Mac mini M1 from 799 euros.

With the ARM technology-based Silicon M1, Apple is saying goodbye to the Intel processors that have been the beating heart of every Mac computer that has rolled off the production line since 2006. It is at least as important a transition as the transition from the PowerPC power source (the main Mac processor since 1994) to the Intel platform. house has developed. The tech giant is not ready for his test piece in that regard. The so-called socs (system-on-a-chip) that power the iPhone, iPad, Apple Watch and Apple TV also come from Apple itself. CEO Tim Cook promised this summer that the first Macs based on Silicon technology would hit the market this year, and the CEO kept his word. The new MacBook Air, MacBook Pro and Mac mini that were unveiled this week are available immediately. On the outside, the three computers have hardly changed. The laptops got a keyboard with a few other keys (such as Do Not Disturb and Dictaphone), the monitors now support P3 wide color (a wider color gamut) and the ports of the Mac mini are now also Thunderbolt and USB 4. Under the hood it’s a whole different story. With its 16 billion transistors, the Silicom M1 not only contains the equivalent of the Intel processor (CPU), but also houses the GPU, Neural Engine and I/O control (input/output). This results in fewer components, but according to Apple also better performance and less energy consumption. For example, the CPU of the three new computers would perform 2.8x to 3.5x better, the GPU 5x to 6x and the Neural Engine even between 9x and 15x. The battery life of the MacBooks also improves considerably: up to 18 hours for the Air, up to 20 hours for the Pro. The latter is the highest autonomy to date for a MacBook. An additional advantage of the switch to its own Silicon processor is that Apple will soon have one universal development platform. Applications that will soon be developed for macOS 11, alias Big Sur, can be made suitable for iOS 14 or iPadOS 14 in no time at all, and vice versa. That may make the Apple ecosystem even more attractive for programmers, because in this way they can kill several birds with one stone. According to Apple, the Intel platform will be supported ‘for several more years’, and the company has a number of new computers anyway. with Intel chips in the pipeline. Will also remain available for the time being: certain MacBook Pros and Mac minis with Intel on board. Target prices: The MacBook Air M1 (13-inch) is available from 1,129 euros, the MacBook Pro M1 (13-inch) from 1,449 euros and the Mac mini M1 from 799 euros.

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Apple introduces notebooks and Mac mini based on its own M1 power source